We are a proud partner of Read Aloud 15 to help remind parents of the importance of daily reading aloud starting at birth. For just 15 minutes a day, you can make a difference. According to Read Aloud, research shows that reading aloud the single most important thing you can do to help a child prepare for reading and learning. Birth to age 3 are critical years in the development of language skills. You help grow vocabulary and knowledge for your child. You can start reading aloud with the Read Aloud’s 21 Day Challenge. With that said, I’ll introduce you to an interactive read aloud Readatron-15 activity from Read Aloud and this can be part of your ‘read aloud’ curriculum.

What is Readatron-15

Readatron-15’s role is to show you how important reading skills are for child’s success in school. It is to help remind you that how beneficial reading is for child’s mind. It shows important it can be for subjects such as art and music as well. You’re building readiness that comes all together. Be consistent and make it fun. And reading doesn’t have to be a book, it can be anything. Remember that you are your child’s first and most important teacher.

Interactive Read Aloud
I grew up in the 80’s and my favorite shows as a kid were usually about robots, and often ones that combined using their unique abilities to create one big robot to defeat evil. It is time to think about that same level of unity ” – Bryan of Read Aloud

Assembling The Paper Robot

Download the Readatron-15 Paper Robot Activity From Read Aloud Here

You can also find more Read Aloud’s activities at their site as well.

Interactive Read Aloud Is Important For Kids and Preschoolers

Benefits Of Play Based Learning

The goal in early childhood education should be to strengthen cognitive and social development. In early childhood, playful learning includes exploration and engagement. Engagement is especially import because by participating in your child’s play will help build strong family bonds. Moreover, play based learning helps develop curiosity, language, and social emotional skills in children. New York State Education Development has a tip sheet how as a parent you can explore and engage in play with your child. Click here to learn more about benefits of play based learning.

Type of Play and Highlighted Benefits Of Play Based Learning

Benefits Of Play Based Learning
credits to nysed.gov

To sum it up, play has physical, cognitive, and social benefits. Active playing helps develop fine and gross motor skills. Also, play helps cognitive thinking; problem solving, independent thinking, hand-eye coordination, and more. Children are constantly exploring, observing and processing new information in their play. Social benefits from playful activities such as hide and seek help build skills like communication, negotiation, and self awareness. You’re also forming strong family bond together.

Benefits Of Play Based Learning
Benefits Of Play Based Learning

How to Strengthen Play Experience

  • Plan activities that encourage participation and maximize children’s interests and skills. (How Learnings Kits Helped Me Teach My Preschooler)
  • By participating in play and following children’s lead.
  • Engage in conversations that deepen children’s understanding of content knowledge .
  • Rotate and provide new materials, play ideas, and task-based explorations.
  • Balance out the curriculum and schedule to include play experiences. (Enroll in our Free Preschool Curriculum)

Benefits Of Play Based Learning in Early Childhood

NAEYC 10 program standards serves as a guide to help parents choose the right preschool program

Choosing the right early childhood program is a critical, but unguided process. The NAEYC has set 10 program standards for early childhood education. The standard acts as a guide to help families choose the right child care center, preschool, or kindergarten.

The NAEYC stands for National Association for the Education of Young Children. It promotes high-quality early learning for all children, birth through age 8, by connecting practice, policy, and research.

In developing their ECE program standards, the NAEYC received input from experts and educators from around the country. Today, the standards and criteria serve as the foundation of the NAEYC Accreditation system for early childhood programs. To earn accreditation, programs must meet all 10 standards.

Below, we’ve summarized the 10 program standards set forth by NAEYC. Despite whether or not the early childhood program you’re exploring is NAEYC accredited, use this as a guide to asking the right questions.

Overview of the NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards

  1. Relationships: Promotes positive relationships among all children and adults. It encourages each child’s sense of individual worth and belonging as part of a community and fosters each child’s ability to contribute as a responsible community member.
  2. Curriculum: Implements a curriculum that is consistent with its goals for children and promotes learning and development in each of the following areas: social, emotional, physical, language, and cognitive.
  3. Teaching: Uses developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate and effective teaching approaches that enhance each child’s learning and development in the context of the curriculum goals.
  4. Assessment of Child Progress: The program is informed by ongoing systematic, formal, and informal assessment approaches to provide information on children’s learning and development.
  5. Health: Promotes the nutrition and health of children and protects children and staff from illness and injury. Programs must be healthy and safe to support children’s healthy development.
  6. Staff Competencies, Preparation, and Support: Employs and supports a teaching staff with the educational qualifications, knowledge, and professional commitment necessary to promote children’s learning and development and to support families’ diverse needs and interests.
  7. Families: Establishes and maintains collaborative relationships with each child’s family to foster children’s development in all settings
  8. Community Relationships: establishes relationships with and uses the resources of the children’s communities to support the achievement of program goals.
  9. Physical Environment: safe and healthful environment that provides appropriate and well-maintained indoor and outdoor physical environments.
  10. Leadership and Management: Program effectively implements policies, procedures, and systems that support stable staff and strong personnel, and fiscal, and program management so all children, families, and staff have high-quality experiences.

The above list is an overview of NAEYC’s program standards. For more detail about each standard and specific directive for what to look for in a program, learn more here. For a printable version of the NAEYC standards in PDF, download it here.

Source: NAEYC.org: The 10 NAEYC Program Standards.

What Standards to Look For In An Early Childhood Preschool Program

First Book Marketplace

First Book Marketplace believes that the best way out of poverty for children in need is through education. For that reason, First Book Marketplace offers quality new books, and educational resources at deeply discounted prices to organizations and educators. First Book aims to remove barriers to quality education for all kids. Books are provided to schools and programs serving children in need, ages 0-18 for free and at low cost. To date, First Book has distributed more than 200 million books and educational resources to schools serving children from low income families.

Hear the story from an educator in Baltimore showing First Book’s impact first-hand.

We were just not aware of all of the offerings that First Book had. We thought that First Book was just books. First Book supplies your classroom from top to bottom. It’s not just a resource for the classroom, but it’s a resource for our parents, our community, and anyone else who is interested in educating our students.
— Chaé Carriere, Field Representative, Baltimore Teachers Union

How Do I Know If I Am Eligible To Sign Up?

If you work at or represent one of the following organizations/programs, you are eligible to sign up with First Book:

  • An emergency program supporting low-income families in response to COVID-19.
  • Head Start
  • Title I or Title I eligible School
  • USDA Food and Nutrition Program
  • Federally Qualified Health Center
  • Title VII recipient
  • Military family support program
  • Library with an E-rate of 90
  • A program primarily serving children with disabilities
  • A program where at least 70% of children come from low-income families.
First Book Marketplace

If I Am A Parent, Am I Eligible To Sign Up?

No, you can’t sign up unless you’re an educator. However, you should check with your school or program if they’re registered with First Book. If your school or program is, your child will be able to get free and low-cost new books and educational resources.

I think I’m Eligible, How Do I Sign Up?

If you’re a eligible, you can sign up for First Book here for free. Once you create an account, you’ll have access to the deeply discounted brand new books available on First Book Marketplace. You’ll also be added to email list to receive notifications about additional benefits including funding opportunities.

Support Children’s Reading With These Free Storybook-based Activities

TigerKubz supports First Book Marketplace mission by removing barriers to quality education resources for all kids. At TigerKubz’s, we empower parents with tools to engage their child in educational activities. We aim to enrich early childhood education through fun and educational engaging activities. We are also free providing comprehensive guidance to parents and hands-on products that are engaging to keep active children.

First Book Marketplace Provides Educational Resources At Deeply Discounted Prices

Conduct an apple investigation using real apples using this printable Apple Investigation booklet by TigerKubz with this fun and easy apple crafts for preschoolers

Are you looking for the best fun and easy apple crafts for preschoolers or toddlers? Look no further! I’ve curated some of the best apple crafts out there that your child will get excited about without the stress!

Fall reminds me of pumpkin spiced lattes and apple picking! It’s the perfect season to engage your preschooler in apple crafts. If you take your little one apple picking, more than likely, you’ll come back with more apples than you know what to do with!

I love to do a combination of crafts using real apples and paper crafts centered around the apple theme. Also, if your child is in daycare or preschool, I guarantee the center will be doing some form of apple theme crafts for preschoolers. This is because school starts in September, it’s apple season, and apple begins with the letter A! The best way to support your child’s learning is to engage in similar activities when they’re home too.

I’ve scoured the web for the best apple crafts that are fun, easy, and utilize items you have around the house for preschoolers. Not only are they easy, the list of apple crafts have a mix of both process and product activities. This is to give your child a mix of different experiences when embarking on their creative journey.

Fun and Easy Apple Crafts for Preschoolers

Fun and Easy Apple Crafts for Preschoolers

Are you looking for the best fun and easy apple crafts for your toddler or preschooler? Look no further! I've curated some of the best apple crafts out there that your child will get excited about without the stress!

Fun and Easy Apple Crafts for Preschoolers

How many books should I read to my toddler a day?

How many books should I read to my toddler a day? I get this question a lot from parents. The rule of thumb is to read for at least 15 minutes a day. Because books vary in length, there isn’t a magic number for the number of books you need to read to your toddler.

You know the saying, quality over quantity? That applies to reading too! Going by how many minutes to read a day instead of how many books is a better gauge. The quality of the reading time matters. Quality of reading does not mean choosing the perfect book, but the engagement during reading. Are you pointing out things in the picture, making predictions, talking about the story, or relating it back to your toddler’s experiences? Engagement during reading helps toddlers build vocabulary, comprehension, and expands their world to new ideas.

I mentioned before that a quality book doesn’t mean the best book – because every person has their own preference, including our toddlers! The best books to read to your toddler are about topics they are interested in (e.g., dinosaurs, cars, trains). If you are looking for new books to add to your collection, you can never go wrong with classics that have stood the test of time. You’ll know they are interested in the book when they ask to read books over and over again. If you read their favorite book repeatedly every day for at least 15 minutes a day, you are already on a roll!

For a starter list of popular children’s classics, look for these books in your local library or at the book store:

  • Brown Bear, Brown Bear by Eric Carle
  • The Hungry, Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  • Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
  • The Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown (click here for free book-based activity ideas)
  • Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson
  • Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina
  • Pete’s a Pizza by William Steig (click here for free book-based activity ideas)
  • Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
  • If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff

Sure, reading the same book can get repetitive for parents, but with every reading, children may be picking up on new themes and ideas. This is how we build reading comprehension!

Next time, don’t worry about how many books you should be reading to your toddler each day. Instead, focus more on the quality of your reading time and aim to read for at least 15 minutes.

How Many Books Should I Read to My Toddler a Day?

The Mid-Autumn Moon Festival is to celebrate the end of a successful rice harvesting season and to hope for another successful season next year. The festival is celebrated in many countries in Asia such as  China, Japan, Vietnam, and more. In Japan, it’s called Tsukimi (Moon-Viewing). In Korea, it’s Chuseok (Autumn Eve).

As part of the mid-autumn festivities, families typically eat mooncakes and light up lanterns. The lanterns come in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes. You can decorate lanterns with anything, from traditional to fun designs. Likewise, you can do the same with mooncakes and decorate colorfully. Above all else, make Mid Autumn Festival for kids fun so everyone in the family enjoys it.

Below, you will find ideas to celebrate the mid-autumn festival that is great for both kids and the whole family!

Make Decorative Mid-Autumn Festival Paper Lantern Crafts for Kids

Paper Lanterns

Mid autumn festival for kids
Credits to goodyfoodies

You’ll first need to get some paper lanterns and you can easily find those at amazon. After you get the paper lanterns, let your kids decorate freely. And for that, I gathered some designs you can look for inspiration.

Angry Birds Lantern
Credits to KarasPartyIdeas

Picture Books in English for Preschoolers Celebrating Mid-Autumn Festival

Mid autumn festival for kids

Round is a Mooncake
By Rosemary Thong, Illustrated by Grace Lin

A little girl’s urban neighborhood becomes a discovery ground for all things round, square, and rectangular in this lyrical picture book. Most items are Asian in origin, others universal: round rice bowls and a found pebble, square dim sum and the boxes that the pizzas come in, rectangular Chinese lace, and a very special pencil case.

Perfect for read-aloud or one-on-one sharing. Lesson Plans can be found here.

Mid autumn festival for kids

Bunny Lune
By Kae Nishimura

Bunny Lune gets a letter from his Japanese friend, Pyonko, about her Otsukimi celebrations and how rabbits are an important part of the lunar holiday. Soon, Lune becomes obsessed with going to the Moon himself. Does he achieve his dream?

Chuseok for kids

Korean Celebrations: Festivals, Holidays and Traditions
By Tina Cho, Illustrated By Farida Zahman

This book allows children to experience Korean culture firsthand by involving them in games, crafts, stories, foods and other activities including preparing and enjoying delicious Songpyeon—sweet dumplings that everyone loves to eat on Chuseok.

Mid-Autumn Festival For Kids

A new bill was recently passed by the governor of California, Gavin Newsom, that will help fund new mental health programs, after-school programs, and more. This new bill will help open up more opportunities for children who did not have these services and it has highlighted how important social-emotional learning is for children. But, this doesn’t mean it stops here. We as parents can continue teaching these SEL skills even at home. Especially teaching our children how to manage their emotions.

A child’s emotions can run wild throughout the day. They can go from being happy with playing with a new toy, to maybe being upset when they don’t get what they want. Emotional intelligence is still being nurtured for young children. But, rest assured all emotions are okay! At an early age, children have a hard time understanding their emotions and knowing how to handle them. That is why it is our job as parents to teach them about their different emotions and how to manage them.

What emotions should we focus on?

The main emotions that can run through a child’s day are happiness, sadness, anger, fear, and disgust. Does this sound familiar? Maybe you have seen it in Disney’s 2015 movie Inside Out. This movie emphasized to the audience, us parents, that all emotions are okay for our child. In the beginning, Joy wanted to block sadness because she saw her as a “bad” emotion to Riley. However, towards the end of the movie, we learn that we actually need sadness in our lives because it’s a natural part of the human experience.

How can we teach emotion-management to our children?

Well, one fun way of teaching it to our children is through stories! Yes, books are so important to our children not just to learn about grammar, but to learn about emotions.

Pro tip: If your child has a hard time coming up with a time they felt an emotion, share your experience with them! They love hearing our stories and it’ll give them time to think!

The best method to teach emotions through reading are:

  1. Ask how the characters of the story are feeling
  2. Follow up with how they know that character is feeling a specific emotion
  3. Ask them about a time in their life when they felt that emotion

A character’s emotion is what drives a story

Many stories are driven through a character’s emotions. No matter the story, you will see one character either sad, upset, joyful, or even scared. Let your child notice these emotions in the story!

Knowing how to identify an emotion

It is very important that our children know how to identify emotions. It is actually one of the best ways to learn about emotion management is recognizing how one is feeling. Your child could identify emotions through expressions! Maybe the main character is happy because your child notices the wide smile across their face. The main character could also be angry because their face is red and they have furrowed eyebrows! 

Your child could also identify emotions through actions a character does. For example, maybe if a character is scared they have a fearful look on their face and they are shivering. Maybe this character is hiding behind a wall or in a closet.

Another way to identify emotions is through verbal interaction. If a character in the story is angry they could be yelling at someone or breaking an object. If a character is very happy maybe they are humming a song or skipping around!

After you have identified emotions within the story it’s time to ask your child when they have felt those emotions.

It’s very simple to ask your child. Let’s use the example of happiness. Ask your child these questions.

  1. When have you felt happy?
  2. Why were you happy?
  3. What do you do when you are happy?
Now you might think happiness might actually be a great emotion overall and that your child needs to be happy 24/7. That is not entirely true. As we’ve pointed out in the beginning, all emotions are important for your child and are natural.

What if you want to identify anger

  1. When and why have you felt angry?
  2. What do you do when you are angry?
  3. What calms you down?

Or how about sadness?

  1. When and why have you felt sad?
  2. What do you do when you are sad?
  3. What makes you feel better?

Notice on bullet point three for both anger and sadness that we point out how to calm ourselves down after feeling such strong emotions. This is where most of the “management” part of emotion management comes in. It’s 100% okay to feel these emotions and we as parents need to emphasize that to our children. 

In fact, there are multiple ways to destress after feeling such emotions. Here are a couple of suggestions…

Another pro tip: Find what your child loves to do! What they do can be a source of mindfulness for them.
  1. Meditation! There are many videos on YouTube just for children.
  2. Drawing, just plain doodling can help distract the mind.
  3. Taking a walk, being around nature can always be calming for many people.
  4. Listening to music. 
  5. Try out our free animal poses yoga cards online! 
  6. Reading a book!

The possibilities are endless! There is no right or wrong way when it comes to relaxing. As a parent, it’s encouraged to help your child find what they like so they have a source to help deal with their emotions.

However, the most important way is to also talk it out with someone. 

As parents, we should be a source of emotional support for our children through their ups and downs.

Even if your child may feel reluctant to share with you, as parents, just letting them know they have a shoulder to lean on helps open so many doors for your child. This will also help nurture them because once they grow up, hopefully, they have an adult they can trust by their side when they need someone to talk to.

Emotion-management important to a child’s wellbeing

If a child cannot communicate their emotions properly they will have a hard time interacting with other people and also containing all those buried emotions deep inside of themselves. Hopefully, this article has helped you gain some tips on how to be emotionally aware and open with your child.

How to Develop a Child’s Emotional Intelligence by Reading